Posted by: Pernicke | May 2012

Freedom 2

Posted by: Pernicke | May 2012

Freedom

Susan B. Anthony

Sojourner Truth

Frederick Douglass

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Lucy Stone

Lucretia Mott

Posted by: Pernicke | May 2012

Sharecropping

This picture shows sharecropping, which is when a

farmer rents land to another person for them to farm

on in exchange for a share of their crop. However, the

system was corrupt because farmers would often

tell their workers that they “owed  money”, though

they actually didn’t. Since the workers couldn’t pay it

because they had just been slaves and never been paid,

they had to work off the money. This resulted in a

vicious circle of debt and the comeback of slavery,

just in another form.

Posted by: Pernicke | May 2012

Equal rights poster

This is a poster demanding equal rights and

equal pay for working African-Americans.

Posted by: Pernicke | May 2012

Slaves picking cotton

This picture shows slaves, both men and women,

picking cotton on a plantation. However, the picture

does not come close to explaining what a hard, cruel,

painful life that a Southern slave had to endure.

Picking cotton is a chore that  causes excessive

bleeding and scratches on the hands due to the

prickles on the plant. If a slave wasn’t working fast

enough, or had accidentally picked a prickle from

the cotton, they would be harshly whipped, possibly

to the point of death, by the overseer.

Posted by: Pernicke | May 2012

Fourteenth Amendment

After the conclusion of the Civil War,

the  Fourteenth Amendment was

finally added to the Constitution in

1868. This amendment stated that

all citizens of the United States could

“not be withheld from their rights

on account of race, religion, or

ethnicity”. However, this amendment

didn’t grant women civil rights. It

wasn’t until 1948, with the

introduction of the Nineteenth

Amendment, that women gained

basic civil rights

Posted by: Pernicke | May 2012

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman was an abolitionist

who created the Underground

Railroad to help slaves in the South

find freedom in the North.

Posted by: Pernicke | May 2012

Abolition vs. Women’s Suffrage

When America was founded, neither women nor African-Americans had civil rights. They didn’t have freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom to assembly, freedom of press, or even one of the most basic freedoms that is now commonly taken for granted, which is the freedom to make your own decisions and live your own life.  Opportunity grew as America grew, but only for white men. When the Civil War began in 1861, women and African-Americans were still deprived of these basic  rights. Soon, protests began and the Abolition movement, which fought for African American’s rights, and the Women’s Suffrage movement, which fought for women’s rights were initiated. Both the Abolition movement and the Women’s Suffrage movement were similar because they were both about fighting for civil rights, both groups were led by dedicated leaders, and both groups fought on behalf of minorities. The Abolition and Women’s Suffrage movements however,  also shared differences which included their time frames, what rights they were granted, and their lasting effects.

When America was founded, neither women nor African-Americans had civil rights. They didn’t have freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom to assembly, freedom of press, or even one of the most basic freedoms that is now commonly taken for granted, which is the freedom to make your own decisions and live your own life.  Opportunity grew as America grew, but only for white men. When the Civil War began in 1861, women and African-Americans were still deprived of these basic  rights. Soon, protests began and the Abolition movement, which fought for African American’s rights, and the Women’s Suffrage movement, which fought for women’s rights were initiated. Both the Abolition movement and the Women’s Suffrage movement were similar because they were both about fighting for civil rights, both groups were led by dedicated leaders, and both groups fought on behalf of minorities. The Abolition and Women’s Suffrage movements however,  also shared differences which included their time frames, what rights they were granted, and their lasting effects.

The main reason that the Abolition movement and the Women’s Suffrage movement were similar is that they were both about fighting for civil rights. When America was founded, neither African-Americans nor women had any rights. African-Americans were slaves and women only did house work. Even as America progressed, both of these groups still couldn’t vote, couldn’t own land, couldn’t serve their country in war, and weren’t free to determine their own culture. Both the Abolition and the Women’s Suffrage movements were about fighting for these rights that we take for granted today.

Another similarity between the Abolition movement and the Women’s Suffrage movement is that both organizations were led by dedicated leaders that fought for both groups. For example, Elizabeth Cady Stanton who was originally an abolitionist also became a prominent figure in the Women’s Suffrage movement. Another important abolitionist that became an important leader in the Women’s Suffrage was Frederick Douglass. Other significant people who helped both causes were Sojourner Truth, Lucy Stone and Lucretia Mott.

A third comparison between the Abolition and Women’s Suffrage movements is that both groups were helping minorities. The definition of minority is a group treated differently because of different race, religion, ethnicity, or gender to the majority of a population. Both African-Americans and women were minorities to  white men due to their race and gender. White women were slightly less of a minority than African-Americans, but still had close to no rights. African-Americans were the second lowest class, only higher than Native Americans.

Though the Abolition and the Women’s Suffrage movements were both about fighting for civil rights, both led by dedicated leaders, and both about helping minorities, the two movements were different mainly because of when they gained their rights and what rights they were granted. During the Civil War on January 1st, 1863, Abraham Lincoln, the current president of the United States, announced the Emancipation Proclamation which declared that all slaves in the South were liberated and no longer slaves. This right had already belonged to women, but Southern slaves only had just had the opportunity to taste the sweet flavor of freedom. However, the Emancipation Proclamation didn’t free Northern slaves. It was only in 1865, with the introduction of the Thirteenth Amendment, when all slaves, in both the North and the South, were freed.

Many people believed that the war was about slavery and slave’s rights, but it wasn’t until 1868, three years after the conclusion of the war and 1870, five years after the war ended, that the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments were added to the Constitution and African-Americans gained rights. The Fourteenth Amendment granted civil rights to African-Americans and the Fifteenth Amendment granted them voting rights, but no Amendment had been passed yet that granted these freedoms to women. This angered many women’s suffrage activists because they thought that if African-Americans were getting their rights, then women should be too. Women began to get angrier and angrier at their lack of civil rights and particularly their lack of voting rights. 1900 came and went and there were still no rights for women. Finally, in 1948, women gained civil rights with the introduction of the Nineteenth Amendment. This contrasts the Abolition movement because women gained their rights 78 years later than African-Americans did. Additionally, the Abolition and Women’s Suffrage movements were different because white women, unlike African-Americans, had already been granted freedom.

Another difference between the Abolition movement and the Women’s Suffrage movement is that even after African-Americans gained their rights, their rights and their freedom was taken away by sharecropping and sentencing to prison without a fair trial, which didn’t happen to women. After the Civil War, newly freed slaves couldn’t support their families, so they had to go back to the plantations they had worked on as slaves and now work on them as paid workers. With all the former slaves returning to work at plantations, a new system was created called sharecropping. Sharecropping is when a farmer rents some of his land to another in exchange for a share of the crop, hence the name, sharecropping. However, at the end of the crop season, the farmer would often tell the worker that they owed the farmer money. Since the worker was a former slave and had no money, they couldn’t pay the debt. The farmer would then demand the former slave to work even more in order to pay off the alleged debt. Then the next year, at the end of the crop season, the farmer would demand more and more money, thus trapping the worker in a never-ending cycle of debt, very similar to slavery. Another way that African-Americans were put in a position similar to slavery was their lack of the right to fair trial. Once thrown in jail, white men could have the “convicts” do work for them without pay. This was also slavery except with workers and not slaves. Women never had to work under these inhumane conditions and their rights were never taken from them, but it took even longer for women to gain their civil rights than for African-Americans. Just like any minority, women deserved and still deserve the same rights and opportunities as anyone else. Since African-Americans had their rights temporarily taken away from them and women hadn’t, the Abolitionist movement and the Women’s Suffrage movement were different in this way as well.

In conclusion, the Abolition movement was similar to the Women’s Suffrage movement because both movements fought for civil rights, both groups were led by dedicated leaders, and both groups fought on behalf of minorities.However, these two groups were  different because of when they were granted their rights, which rights they were granted, and the aftermath of their “freedom”. The Civil War was the bloodiest war in American history and it destroyed many valuable lives, but in its essence it signifies freedom. It signifies the freedom to live, the freedom to argue, and the freedom to fight for civil rights. These two movements, even after everything they had been through, continue to live, continued to argue, and continued to fight for their rights. Even though many say that the legacy of war is death or the legacy of war is hope, the real legacy is to fight for what any person believes in.

Posted by: Pernicke | May 2012

Bibliography

  • Garcia, Jesus, Donna M. Ogle, C. Frederick Risinger, Joyce Stevos, and Winthrop D. Jordan. “Abolition and Women’s Rights.” Creating America. Evanston, Boston, Dallas: McDougal Littell. 424-29. Print.
  • Rinaldi, Ann. In My Father’s House. New York: Scholastic, 1993. Print.

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